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Posts Tagged ‘sleep test

mind-racing

Insomnia can make you feel like your mind is racing out of control. A revealing new study explains why your brain may be unable to put the brakes on your thoughts. It links the problem to low levels of a brain chemical.

A new study shows that GABA levels are reduced by 30 percent in adults with chronic primary insomnia. The study was published in the Nov. 1 issue of the journal Sleep.

GABA is reduced in the brain of individuals with insomnia, suggesting over activity is present. It was explained that low GABA levels create an imbalance of brain activity. This may lead to an inability to shut down waking signals in the brain.

If your GABA levels are low, then your mind can’t slow down. It may race forward at full speed even when it is time to sleep. An over active mind is a key feature of psychophsicological insomnia. At bedtime you are unable to stop thinking and worrying. Your body may be ready for sleep, but your mind remains alert. This state of “hyperarousal” can make it hard for you to fall asleep.

Most with insomnia have “secondary” insomnia. It occurs along with another medical problem, mental illness or sleep disorder. It also may result from the use of a medication or substance. In contrast primary insomnia is unrelated to another health problem. Estimates that about 25 percent of people with insomnia have primary insomnia. The study only links low GABA levels to long lasting, primary insomnia.

All participants in the study had been suffering from primary insomnia for mor than six months. The average duration of their symptoms was about 10 years. The GABA connection affirms that primary insomnia is a legitimate disorder.

Recognition that insomnia has manifestations in the brain may increase the legitimacy of those who have insomnia and report substantial daytime  consequences. It was also explained that insomnia can affect your energy, concentration and mood. It also increases your risk of depression.

One solution for the problem of primary insomnia is the use of hypnotic medication. The short-term use of a sleeping pill can help break the cycle of sleepless nights. The study notes that many of the most effective sleeping pills increase activity at the GABA neurons.

Another treatment option is cognitive behavioral therapy. CBT helps you learn how to correct attitudes and habits that hinder your sleep. Many of these bad habits develop as people try to cope with chronic insomnia.

1. The record for the longest period without sleep is 18 days, 21 hours, 40 minutes during a rocking chair marathon.  The record  holder reported hallucinations, paranoia, blurred vision, slurred speech and memory and concentration lapses.

2. Anything less than five minutes to fall asleep at night means you’re sleep deprived. The ideal is between 10 and 15 minutes, meaning you’re still tired enough to sleep deeply, but no so exhausted you feel sleepy by day.

3. It’s impossible to tell if someone is really awake without close medical supervison. People can take cat naps with their eyes open without even being aware of it, microsleep.

4. A new baby typically results in 400-750 hours lost sleep for parents in the first year.

5. One of the best predicors of insomnia later in life is the development of bad habits from having been sleep deprived by young children.

6. The continuous brain recordings that led to the discovery of REM (rapid eye movement) sleep were not done until 1953, partly because the scientists involved were concerned about wasting paper.

7. REM sleep occurs in bursts totaling about 2 hours a night, usually beginning about 90 minutes after falling asleep.

8. Dreams, once thought to occure only during REM sleep, also occure (but to a lesser extent) in non-REM sleep phases. It’s possible there may not be a single moment of our sleep when we are actually dreamless.

9. REM dreams are characterized by bizarre plots, but non-REM dreams are repetirive and thought-like, with little imagery obesessively returning to a suspicion that you left your mobile phone somewhere, for example.

10. Certain types of eye movements during REM sleep correspond to specific movements in dreams, suggesting at least part of the dreaming process is analogous to watching a film.

11. No-one knows for sure if other species dream, but some do have similar sleep cycles to humans.

12. Elephants sleep standing up during non-REM sleep, but lie down for REM sleep.

13. Some scientists believe we dream to fix experiences in long-term memory, that is, we dream about things worth remembering. Others reckon we dream about things worth forgetting to eliminate overlapping memories that would otherwise clog up our brains.

14. Dreams may not serve any purpose at all but be merely a meaningless byproduct of two evolutionary adaptations: sleep and consciousness.

15. REM sleep may help developing brains mature. Premature babies have 75 percent REM sleep, 20 percent more than full-term babies. Similerly, a newborn kitten, puppy, rat or hamster experiences only REM sleep, while a  newborn guinea pig (which is much more developed at birth) has almost no REM sleep at all.

16. Scientists have not been able to explain a 1998 study showing a bright light shone on the backs of human knees can reset the brain’s sleep-wake clock.

17. British Ministy of Defense researchers has been able to reset soldiers’ body clocks so they can go without sleep for up to 36 hours. Tiny optical fibers embedded in special spectacles project a ring of bright white light ( with a spectrum identical to a sunrise) around the edge of soldiers’ retinas, fooling them into thinking they have just woken up. The system was first used on US pilots during the bombing in Kosovo.

18. Seventeen hours of sustained wakefulness leads to a decrease in performance equivalent to a blood alcohol-level of 0.05%.

19. The 1989 Exxon Valdex oil spill off Alaska, the Challenger space shuttle disaster and the Chernobyl nuclear accident have all been attributed to human errors in which sleep-deprivation played a role.

20. The NRMA insurance estimated fatigue is involved in one in 6 fatal road accidents.

21. Exposure to noise at night can suppress immune function even if the sleeper doesn’t wake. Unfamiliar noise, and noise during the first and last two hours of sleep, has the greatest disruptive effect on the sleep cycle.

22. The “natural alarm clock” which enables some people to wake up more or less when they want to is caused by a burst of the stress hormone adrenocorticotropin. Researchers say this reflects an unconscious anticipation of the stress of waking up.

23. Some sleeping tablets, such as barbiturates supress REM sleep, which can be harmful over a long period.

24. In insomnia following bereavement, sleeping pills can disrupt grieving.

25. Tiny luminous rays froma digital alarm clock can be enough to disrupt the sleep cycle even if you are not fully awake. The light turns off a “neutral switch” in the brain, causing levels of a key sleep chemical to decline within minutes.

26. To doze off, we must cool off; body temperature and the brain’s sleep-wake cycle are closely linked. That’s why hot summer nights can cause a restless sleep. The blood flow mechanism that transfer core body heat to the skin works best between 18-30 degress. But later in life, the comfort zone shrinks to between 23-25 degress, one reason why older people have more sleep disorders.

27. A night on the grog (alochol) will help you get to sleep but it will be a light slumber and you won’t dream much.

28. After five nights of partial sleep deprivation, three drinks will have the same effect on your body as six would when you’ve slept enough.

29. Humans sleep on average around three hours less than other primates like chimps, rhesus monkeys, squirrel monkeys and baboons, all of whome sleep for 10 hours.

30. Dolphins at risk of attack by predators are able to balance the need for sleep and survival, keeping one half of the brain awake while the other slips into sleep mode.

31. Ten percent of snorers have sleep apnea, a disorder which causes sufferers to stop breathing up to 300 times a night and significantly increases the risk of sufferig a heart attack or stroke.

32. Snoring occurs only in noo-REM sleep.

33. Teenagers need as much sleep as small children ( about 10 hrs.) while those over 65 need the least of all ( about six hours). For the average adult aged 25-55, eight hours is considered optimal.

34. Some studies suggest women need up to an hour’s extra sleep a night compared to men, and not getting it may be one reason women are much more susceptible to depression than men.

35. Feeling tired can feel normal after a short time. Those deliberately deprived of sleep for research initially noticed greatly the effects on their alterness, mood and physical performance, but the awareness dropped off after the first few days.

36. Diaries from the pre-electric-light-globe Victorian era show adults slept nine to ten hours a night with periods of rest changing with the seasons in line with sunrise and sunsets.

37. Most of what we know about sleep we’ve learned in the past 25 years.

38. As a group, 18-24 year-olds deprived of sleep suffer more from impaired performance than older adults.

39. Experts say one of the most alluring sleep distractions is the 24-hour accessibility of the internet.

40. The extra-hour of sleep received when clock are put back at the start of daylight savings has been found to coincide with a fall in the number of road accidents.

Tired foreign truck drivers have been pleading with UK police to arrest them so they can get some food and sleep, says a senior officer. Chief superintendent Ceraint Anwyl, chairman of the National Roads Policing, says drivers have been phoning forces across Britain to ask to spend the night in jail so they can take a break from driving, despite the fact it also means paying a fine. The drivers give details of their registration and where they are.

They are often discovered to have been driving unsafe vehicles for 30 hours without a break, and are arrested and charged with failing to keep a proper driving record or ignoring tachograph readings. Anwyl says: “They say I am tired. I have been driving for so many hours; please stop me because I’m dangerous on the road. If you do, I promise I’ll never work for this company again.”

It has come to the point where truckers have to turn themselves in because they are so tired, that’s just so sad to hear. There are so many dangers with someone aiding a large vehicle and not being completely coherent, and drowsy. Hopefully things will look up when D.O.T makes some changes to help these drivers. If it wasn’t for them, we wouldn’t have the many things it take to supply a home, a business, and our economy.

 

  Microsleep, ever heard of it? Do you what it means? Wonder if it has ever happened to you? I use to get it when I was working night shifts, and my circadian clock was still working on daytime hours. I would have a 45 miunute drive home, and there would be times when I would get home, and only then I realized, ‘Wow how did get here…so fast?!’ …puzzeling, but then there were times the thudding of the relectors would bring me to realization that I was starting to doze off. At the same time I felt like my eyes were open the whole time, and that’s because they were!

A Microsleep; is an episode of sleep lasting from a fraction of a second up to several seconds. It often occurs as a result of sleep deprivation, metal fatigue, sleep apnea, narcolepsy, or hypersomnia. People who experience excessive daytime sleepiness are at high risk for Mircrosleep episodes.

Microsleeps can occur at any time, typically without significant warning. In the middle of even lively conversations, the onset of a Microsleep episode can cause sufferers to ‘suddenly’ lose sync in a conversation.

Microsleeps becomes extremely dangerous when occurring during situations which demand continual alertness, such as driving a motor vehicle or working with heavy machinery. People who experience microsleeps usually remain unaware of them, instead believing themselves to have been awake the whole time, or feeling a sensation of ‘spaceing out.’ One example is called “gap driving”: from the perspective of the driver, he or she was driving a car, and then suddenly realizes that several secondes have passed bu unnoticed, or like in my case 45 minutes!

Sleep is on the rise of awareness; so much is starting to show how the effects of sleep really play on your health, and that’s mental health, physical health, and how much we take it for granted. We only have 24 hours in a day, an we think that there is so much that needs to be done in such a short tmie, and that  cut comes out of our sleep.

Sleep disorders can be hard to identify, especially if their symptoms occure while you’re asleep. Amy Petrik, 40, spent three months and visited four doctors searching for the cause of her persistent laryngitis. Once she was diagnosed and treated for sleep apnea, she got back her voice -and reclaimed her health.

 It was about four years ago that I first began to wonder what exactly was wrong with me. I hadn’t felt well in quite some time, and my normally upbeat personality was dragging to the point where other people had started to notice.

I had memory problems, severe mood swings, and anxiety issues. I woke up every morning with headaches and a dry, swollen throat, and was getting up to use the bathroom several times a night.

I felt unhealthy and unhappy, but I work two jobs, so I just assumed I was overly tired. My days were filled with four-hour naps, and still occasionally nodded off. I mentioned my complaints to a few different doctors, but no one seemed to take them too seriously; even my elevated blood pressure and cholesterol level didn’t set off any alarms. And so I attributed it all to a mix of mild depression and extreme fatigue. (Only later did a sleep specailist tell me that depression, weight gain, and fatigue are all symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea.)

A wake-up call to get help
In early February, I lost my voice for three full weeks. I mean literally: Not like laryngitis or just a sore throat, but I actually couldn’t make any sound but squeaks. I was terrified. My family physician was on vacation, so I saw another doctor in his practice. She whipped me into her office and within minutes took my vitals and diagnosed my with strep throat. I tried whispering to her what was going on, but she didn’t pay too much attention to my concerns. Without even giving me any test, she prescribed some medication and told me to come back in a week if I didn’ t improve.

I was back in seven days. The doctor claimed she didn’t have time to see me (my regular physician was still out), but I complanied enough by writing notes back and forth to the nurse on duty and was finally allowed  back into an exam room. I again explained, through writing, that my throat had not improved and that I needed help. Her only solutions? Hot tea with honey and vitamin C.

At this point I turned to an ear, nose, and throat specialist at the advice of some friends. He immediately saw the warning signs that everyone else had missed and scheduled me for a sleep study.

A sleep test and a scary diagnosis
I went to the sleep lab in early April. Afterward my ENT told me that I had the most danerous case of sleep apnea he had ever seen: He told me that I stopped breathing 120 times per hour, I wasn’t getting enough oxygen to my lungs, and my cardiovascular system was steadily wearing dow. It was mind-blowing. I can only remember sitting in his office crying uncontrollably, my mom doing all the talking.

It sounds overdramatic, but I knew I was going down the same path my father had taken: He was overweight the majority of his life, had high blood pressure, and all kinds of medical problems, including untreated sleep apnea. He passed away at 67, and I was afraid I’d end up just like him, gone too soon, if I didn’t get assistance right away.

Slow but steady treatment
The doctor told me that I had to lose a significant amount of weight to cure my sleep apnea, either that, or get a tracheotomy. Of course I didn’t want a hole in my throat, but I was looking for any help I could get: Losing weight seemed impossible, since I was exhausted all the time. One other option, although my doctor warned me that results may be minimal, was to remove my tonsils and adenoids. I had the surgery later that month, followed by another sleep study. I was disappointed: The setting for my CPAP machine went from 13 (the hightest possible pressure) just down to 11.

As a naturally clasustrophobic person, learning to use the CPAP machine has been difficult. The first night I took it home, I made my mom stay overnight because I was so terrified to sleep with it. I had to try three different types before I found one -a small nasal mask -that I can actually tolerate. Even then it took me sometime to get comfortable with.

Now, I swear by my CPAP machine. I actually tell people that it’s time for me to go home to bed so that I can breathe in fresh air all night long! It has become a regular part of my bedtime ritual, and I don’t go anywhere without it. Until I am given the green light that I no longer need to wear this lifesaving device, it will always be with me.

Still room for improvement
My sleep patterns have improved, and I no longer have to take naps to play catch up in the afternoons. I don’t have sore throats in the morning. My blood pressure is back in the healthy range, and I’ve joined Weight Watchers and am finally starting to shed some pounds. I’m feeling a lot better, health-wise.

Getting the word out
I’ve become a spokesperson for my family and friends, letting others know about what can happen if you do not get treated. I’m sure some of my loved one also have sleep apnea, and some them tell me they’re just scared to hear the results. That’s pretty frustrating to hear, considering how much I suffered before I was diagnosed and how much better I feel now.

I try to tell people, please stop what you are doing and make an appointment today! If you are afraid of doctors, don’t be. If your afrais to go to the sleep lab, take along a friend, your mom, your wife or husband, or just take along something comforting to have by your side. This is your life we are talking about, and I promise you, you will not regret it.

-Amy Petrik
Recovering Sleep Apnea Patient.

 Imagine this… you are peacefully enjoying a deep, restful sleep and maybe even dreaming of selacing on a sunny beach; listening to the ocean’s waves lap against the shores edge. The sun’s warming you, feeling calm and so relaxed, you breathe in the warmth-wait! the shocking screech of the morning alarm clock is blaring…no, it’s your bed-partner’s SNORE!

  You lie there, trying to ignore the chain-saw noise of the snoring. You’ve closed your eyes, ahhh silence, and thoughts of the intrusion has stopped. But, only to be startled by the sound of 1,000 bikers riding along side your bed. With every snarl you become more and more fustrated and unable to sleep. You try to resist waking your bed-partner who is totally unaware of your growing fustrations. You ask yourself ” Why should I be the one to suffer?” and with that you elbow them, they roll over, never waking up. Minutes later, the snorings’ begin again. Your enduring nightly awakening until the fustration and fatigue become too much.

  Lovers quarrels increase and the emotional gap between you widens. In one last attempt to  alleviate the problem, you start sleeping seperatly, and then in other rooms of the house. This is a quick, but short fix. The loss of intimacy makes you feel worried, alone, and stressed. All the while lying awake, again, this time alone in bed.

Without the power of restorative sleep, relationship difficulties are more difficult to ignore and the downward sprial continues.

Snoring isn’t sexy! No one wants to be woken up by the loud, annoying sound, roaring from their loved one. Snoring can be a nightmare for snorers & their beleagues partners, who may wake up severl times a night, some lose up to an hour a night, just to poke, prode and even hoist loved onto their sides for a little relief. It’s no wonder that bleary spouses can wake up grumpy and resentful.

The sound of a Harley Convention going off in your bedroom on a nightly basis, should be taken seriously. If your spouse is snoring loud, and then stopping just long enough for you to think your going to get some shut eye, then “VROOM-VROOM”  it starts again, could be they have stopped breathing. Loud snoring is one of the most recognizable signs of Obstrutive Sleep Apnea. Between 12 & 18 million Americans have some form of sleep apnea.

Although awareness of sleep apnea is growing, specialist say this condition is still vastly undertreated. Primary care physicians don’t routinely ask parients about their quality of sleep- though that is beginning to change. If you or your partner can’t sleep because the sound of the woodsmen starting is chain-saw, is keeping you awake, talk to someone, see someone, get informed!

BE HAPPY, BE HEALTHY….TOGETHER!


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