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Posts Tagged ‘OSA

 
manheadacheWhen you’re feeling stressed on the job, it can be hard to leave work at the office. Your job may preoccupy your mind as you drive, as you eat, and as you interact with family or friends. But the battle to control your mind can intensify when you try to go to sleep.

Sleep and stress are competitors. When stress continually activating a part of the brain that is otherwised used for sleep, then stress wins the tug-of-war.

According the AASM, job stress can be a cause of adjustment insomnia. This involves disturbed sleep or sleeplessness that may last for a few days or a few weeks. Other symptoms may include anxiety, worry and tension.

A common feature of adjustment insomnia is “ruminative thoughts.”  This is when you dwell on the same thoughts, chewing them over and over in your mind. You may lie in bed staring at the ceiling, unable to stop thinking about work. Even when you finally fall asleep, your work may invade your dreams. The Staples National Small-Business Survey polled 302 owners and executives of small businesses, and more than half said they dream about work -or “sleepwork.”

Scientific research confirms that job stress can affect your sleep. In 2005 a study in the journal Sleep involved 8,770 Japanese workers. In both men and women, a high level of stress at work was liked to insomnia.

A 2007 study in the International Journal of Behavioral Medicine linked insomnia to these three types of job stressors:

  • High work demand
  • Low influence over decisions
  • High professional compromise

The type of job stress you experience may affect your sleep in different ways. Another study linked work overload to poor sleep quality.  Having role conflicts at work was related to non-restorative sleep and trouble falling asleeo or staying asleep.

According to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, sleep disturbances are one early warning sign of job stress. Others may include:

  • Headaches
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Short temper
  • Upset stomach
  • Job dissatisfaction
  • Low morale

Job stress may be unavoidable. But sleep specialists say you can take steps to improve your sleep even when you are stressed.  Establishing a pattern of relaxing behaviors close to bedtime and limiting work to the early evening may help to reduce stress.

Here are jus a few more tips to help you be less restless with work worries:

  • Remain active
    Try to get some exervise every day. Both your mind and body will be more relaxed when its bedtime.
  • Express yourself
    Take some time to slow down before going to bed. Get away from the computer, turn off the TV and the cell phone, and relax quietly for 15 to 30 minutes. Take a warm bath, enjoy a light snack or listen to some soft music.
  • Avoid “bedwork”
    Never bring any work to bed with  you; your bed should be refuge from your job. Also avoid doing other activities in bed such as reading, watching TV or talking on the phone. Only use your bed for sleep.
  • Get out of bed
    If you have trouble falling asleep, get out of bed and do something relaxing until you feel sleep agian. Tossing and turning will only increase your frustrations.
  • See a specialist
    Some doctors are specialists in behavioral sleep medicine. They can teach you how to relax at bedtime so you can fall asleep more easily.

saving money

 Current economic conditions in the U.S. are forcing many consumers to cut back on health care expenses. Yet sleep experts advise that the cost of a sleep study is a sound investment for millions of people who suffer from a sleep disorder.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that about 15 million adults in the U.S. did not receive needed medical care in 2005 because they could not afford it. In July, the National Association of Insurance Commissioners conduted a national survey. Results show that 22 percent of people have reduced the number of times they visit the doctor because to current economic conditions.

 In such a challenging economy, should your sleep needs be a priority?

Sleep is one of the cornerstones of good health. It affects everything from your weight and blood pressure to your energy and mood. If you have been struggling with an ongoing sleep problem, then a sleep study may be just what you need. It could be the key that unlocks the door to a dramatic improvement in your health and a better quality of life for you.

 Losing sleep over the economy, but losing sleep over an undiagnosed problem is no fun.

People are notorious for underestimating how sleepy they are. People assume that thier disrupted sleep and level of sleepiness when awake is normal for their age. Symptoms of some sleep disorders also can go unnoticed. For example loud snoring and gasping for breath durning sleep are two warning signs for sleep apnea. But you may be unaware of these sym if you live or sleep alone. As a result, millions of people go through each day wondering why they can’t stay awake. Others go to bed each night wondering why they can’t sleep. The answers to these questions often can be found by a sleep study…

    Here are some benefits to think about:
Research shows that there are numerous benefits to detecing a sleep disorder with a sleep study.  The study pinpoints the nature and cause of your sleep problem. This provides the foundation for an effective treatment plan. Treating a sleep disorder promotes heath, productivity and well-being. In the long run it also can save you money!

  • Improved Health
    Research has linked sleep disorders to many other health problems. These include heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, diabetes and obesity. A study in the journal Sleep even shows that people with severe, untreated sleep apnea have five times the risk of dying from a heart problem. Effective treatment of a sleep disorder can reduce the risk and severity of other related health challenges.
  • Reduced Spending
    Studies have linked undetected and untreated sleep disorders to an increase in health-care utilization and spending. You are likely to make more visits to the doctor’s office each year. You are also likely to spend more money on your health care. Expenses may include testing, medications and hospitalization. Research shows that effective treatment of a sleep disorder can reduce your health-care spending. Compared to the high cost of remaining untreated, treating most sleep disorders is relative inexpensive.
  • Greater Productivity
    Studies have linked sleep disorders to lower productivity and more absences at work. A severe sleep disorder may even prevent you from being able to stay employed. Effective treatments of a sleep disorder can enable you to improve your job performance.
  • Better Safety
    Research has linked sleep disorders to an increased risk of work-related injuries and motor-vehicle accidents. Effective treatments promotes your safety at work on the roads.
  • Improved Quality of Life
    Sleep disorders can take a severe tool on your personal well-being. Taking care of yourself leads to improvements in your mood, attitude, energy, memory and overall outlook on life. Sleep disturbances can put strain on your relationships.

Mysleepapnea.com can help you with obtaining a Home Sleep Test.

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  Microsleep, ever heard of it? Do you what it means? Wonder if it has ever happened to you? I use to get it when I was working night shifts, and my circadian clock was still working on daytime hours. I would have a 45 miunute drive home, and there would be times when I would get home, and only then I realized, ‘Wow how did get here…so fast?!’ …puzzeling, but then there were times the thudding of the relectors would bring me to realization that I was starting to doze off. At the same time I felt like my eyes were open the whole time, and that’s because they were!

A Microsleep; is an episode of sleep lasting from a fraction of a second up to several seconds. It often occurs as a result of sleep deprivation, metal fatigue, sleep apnea, narcolepsy, or hypersomnia. People who experience excessive daytime sleepiness are at high risk for Mircrosleep episodes.

Microsleeps can occur at any time, typically without significant warning. In the middle of even lively conversations, the onset of a Microsleep episode can cause sufferers to ‘suddenly’ lose sync in a conversation.

Microsleeps becomes extremely dangerous when occurring during situations which demand continual alertness, such as driving a motor vehicle or working with heavy machinery. People who experience microsleeps usually remain unaware of them, instead believing themselves to have been awake the whole time, or feeling a sensation of ‘spaceing out.’ One example is called “gap driving”: from the perspective of the driver, he or she was driving a car, and then suddenly realizes that several secondes have passed bu unnoticed, or like in my case 45 minutes!

Sleep is on the rise of awareness; so much is starting to show how the effects of sleep really play on your health, and that’s mental health, physical health, and how much we take it for granted. We only have 24 hours in a day, an we think that there is so much that needs to be done in such a short tmie, and that  cut comes out of our sleep.

 Imagine this… you are peacefully enjoying a deep, restful sleep and maybe even dreaming of selacing on a sunny beach; listening to the ocean’s waves lap against the shores edge. The sun’s warming you, feeling calm and so relaxed, you breathe in the warmth-wait! the shocking screech of the morning alarm clock is blaring…no, it’s your bed-partner’s SNORE!

  You lie there, trying to ignore the chain-saw noise of the snoring. You’ve closed your eyes, ahhh silence, and thoughts of the intrusion has stopped. But, only to be startled by the sound of 1,000 bikers riding along side your bed. With every snarl you become more and more fustrated and unable to sleep. You try to resist waking your bed-partner who is totally unaware of your growing fustrations. You ask yourself ” Why should I be the one to suffer?” and with that you elbow them, they roll over, never waking up. Minutes later, the snorings’ begin again. Your enduring nightly awakening until the fustration and fatigue become too much.

  Lovers quarrels increase and the emotional gap between you widens. In one last attempt to  alleviate the problem, you start sleeping seperatly, and then in other rooms of the house. This is a quick, but short fix. The loss of intimacy makes you feel worried, alone, and stressed. All the while lying awake, again, this time alone in bed.

Without the power of restorative sleep, relationship difficulties are more difficult to ignore and the downward sprial continues.

Snoring isn’t sexy! No one wants to be woken up by the loud, annoying sound, roaring from their loved one. Snoring can be a nightmare for snorers & their beleagues partners, who may wake up severl times a night, some lose up to an hour a night, just to poke, prode and even hoist loved onto their sides for a little relief. It’s no wonder that bleary spouses can wake up grumpy and resentful.

The sound of a Harley Convention going off in your bedroom on a nightly basis, should be taken seriously. If your spouse is snoring loud, and then stopping just long enough for you to think your going to get some shut eye, then “VROOM-VROOM”  it starts again, could be they have stopped breathing. Loud snoring is one of the most recognizable signs of Obstrutive Sleep Apnea. Between 12 & 18 million Americans have some form of sleep apnea.

Although awareness of sleep apnea is growing, specialist say this condition is still vastly undertreated. Primary care physicians don’t routinely ask parients about their quality of sleep- though that is beginning to change. If you or your partner can’t sleep because the sound of the woodsmen starting is chain-saw, is keeping you awake, talk to someone, see someone, get informed!

BE HAPPY, BE HEALTHY….TOGETHER!

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  The intention of surgery is to open the airway sufficiently to eliminate or to reduce obstructions to a clinically insignificant level. In order to do so, surgical therapy in adults often must reconstruct the soft tissues (such as the uvula and the palate) or the bony tissues (the jaw) of the throat.

If you have been diagnosed with OSA and are considering surgery, talk to a sleep specialist and/or experienced surgeon about the different procedures, and the chances they will be effective to you, with your anatomy and why, and most of all the risks involved with surgery. Untreated sleep apnea can be harmful to your health, and surgery cannot always address all the points of obstruction. Eliminating the snoring does not necessarily eliminate the apneas. Sometimes surgery does not cure sleep apnea but reduces the number of apneas so that more treatment options are available to you and/or more comfortable. Yet in some circumstances, surgery may actually worsen the apnea.Insurance typically covers surgery for sleep apnea but not all surgical procedures. However, insurance companies that initially refuse to pay for a surgery may be convinced otherwise upon an appeal that demonstrates the efficacy and appropriateness of the surgery in your case. Throat pain from the major surgeries varies but is generally significant, often for one to two weeks. Most surgical procedures for sleep apnea are conducted in a hospital under general anesthetic. (People with sleep apnea must be cautious about general anesthesia–no matter for what medical condition the surgery is–because of the effects anesthesia has on the airway.)The most common surgery for sleep apnea is the uvulopalatopharyngoplasty, or UPPP procedure, which is intended to enlarge the airway by removing or shortening the uvula and removing the tonsils and adenoids, if present, as well as part of the soft palate or roof of the mouth. (The uvula is the tissue that hangs from the middle of the back of the roof of the mouth; the word comes from the Latin “uva” meaning “grapes.”) According to the “Practice Parameters for the Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Surgical Modifications of the Upper Airway,” issued in 1996 by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, the overall efficacy is 40.7%. A more recent surgery using a laser (laser-assisted uvulopalatoplasty or LAUP, a modification of the UPPP where the surgeon cuts the uvula with a laser) is performed for snoring. There is not yet enough information to say whether LAUP is effective for OSA. 

There are other surgical procedures where a part of the tongue is removed, and two which try to enlarge the airway by moving the jaw forward. These surgeries do have very high success rates but are long and involved (lasting several hours) with a significant recovery period and potential complications that patients may reject. As a rule, success rates for these complicated surgeries are higher when preformed by an experienced surgeon. You may have to undergo more than one procedure to eliminate the apneas sufficiently. In review, when weighing surgery, consider whether the safety and efficacy of the procedure have met the medical journals and cases studied are similar to yours. Surgery helps many, but effectiveness varies from person to person. It is also highly recommended that with surgery you have follow up sleep studies often, to evaluate your current conditions. If unsure about proceeding, you should seek a second opinion. Only a doctor who has examined you and your airways/complications can advise you on finding the correct surgery best for your needs.

 **Physicians who perform surgery for sleep apneas are most commonly otolaryngologists (specializing in the ears, nose, and throat) and oral and maxillofacial surgeons. If you are seeking a referral to a surgeon or a second opinion, you may find one through your physician or through a sleep center, and keep in mind that your insurance policy may require you to get a referral for a specialist and/or to see a specific provider.**

 

 

 

 

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  Moderate to severe cases of OSA (obstructive sleep apnea) significantly increases the risk of suffering a stroke. The study of 1,475 people found that those with moderate to sever sleep apnea at beginning of the study were 3 to 4 times more likely to have a stroke than a comparable group of patients without sleep apnea during the next four years. The study did not find any significant increase in the odds of having a stroke for people with mild sleep apnea compared with people without sleep apnea. The stroke risk we found for people with moderate to severe sleep apnea is quite significant- double the risk of other well -known risk factors for stroke, such as hypertension or diabetes. It was even found that the risk of stroke was significant even after other risk factors for stroke, such as high blood pressure and obesity, were taken into account.

   The patients in the study were defined as having moderate to sever obstruction sleep apnea in their breathing stopped or slowed at least 20 times per hour of sleep. People whose breathing stopped or slowed between 5 and 20 times per hour of sleep were considered to have mild sleep apnea. One reason obstructive sleep apnea may increase stroke risk is that it has been shown to cause high blood pressure, with this, it is the most common risk factor for stroke. Another possible reason is that when a person stops breathing, the lack of oxygen kick in the body’s “fight or flight” response. Part of that reaction is to make the blood more clottable, and blood clots in the brain can cause a stroke.    

    This study provides yet another reason why it’s so important to treat sleep apnea with all caution as possible. It also raises the question of weather people with sleep apnea should be put on aspirin therapy or given other anti-clotting drugs/medications, which is what is done for other people with stroke risk, but this is an issue that needs further research.

Sleep apnea increases risk of heart attack and/or death up by 30%.

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