MySleepApnea.Org

Posts Tagged ‘losing weight

Yes, ladies, that is a clue, to get more sleep! Theres a reason they call it beauty sleep.

Sleep helps you restore to your body’s full potential; including weight! Sleep influences the hormones in the body related to hunger. A good night’s rest can improve the chances of successful weight loss.

Adequate rest could play an important role in shedding pounds. It might seem like one more thing added to the long to-do list for losing weight, but paying attention to sleep patterns and getting the recommended amount of shuteye might help with reducing the number on the scale.

According to the National Sleep Foundation 63% of Americans do not get 8 hours of sleep a day and 31% get less then 7 hours on week days. In their 2008 Sleep America Poll, 72% of the respondents were overweight or obese. For, work days, these individuals reported less time in bed than the average weight respondents.

Simply stated, many people are not well rested. This is an even more improtant issue for those struggling to lose weight. Among other health risks, sleep deprivation could contradict weight loss effots by increasing hunger.

Sleep & Hormones

Sleep deprivation influences two hormones that play a major role in appetite. Ghrelin is a hormone that is responsible for increasing appetite. Leptin is a hormone that lets the brain know when the body is full, therefore decreasing appetite.

When sleep deprivation occurs there is a decrease in leptin (the full hormone) and an increase in ghrelin (the appetite hormone). This leads to an increase in appetite overall. It appears taht this can result in hunger and increased food intake the day following a night of too little sleep.

How much?

Adults need 7-9 hours of sleep a night. Unfortunantely, there is no specific number of hours that is considered enough sleep. Several factors, including age and gender, influence how much one need to be well rested. Researching is still being conducted to look more closely at the variations in sleep requirements.

Getting a good nights sleep

The National Sleep Foundation offers these tips to improve the quality and quantity of sleep.

  • Before bedtime choose activities that are relaxing such as reading an enjoyable book or listening to soothing music. Avoid stressful activities such as paying bills or engaging in problem-solving.
  • Avoid alcohol, caffeine, and tobacco products close to bedtime. All can disrupt sleep and influence sleep quality.
  • Eat and exercise at least 3 hours prior to bedtime. This reduces the possible disruption of falling asleep and staying asleep due to digestion, frequent bathroom trips and elevated body temperature.
  • Make an effort to create a sleep-friendly environment. The bedroom should be dark, quiet and cool. Sleep on a supportive mattress and pillows, and decorate in a way that is inviting and free of allergens.
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 If losing weight were simple, Spandx would be just another screen name in a S&M chat room. But dieting is complicated: There are even ways to screw it up without even realizing it. For instance, who would ever think that working out in the a.m. or cranking the AC might be the reason you’re not slimming down?  Luckily, once you’ve ID’d these flubs, fixing them is nowhere near as hard as pulling on a pair of control-top hose.

Roadblock No. 1:   You work out at 6 a.m.

And what’s wrong with that? Morning workouts are great- if you go to bed at 10 p.m.  In a recent study in the American Journal of Epidemiology, women who slept seven or more hours a night were less likely to put on weight then women who didn’t. Those who slept only six hours a night were 12 percent more likely to gain substantial weight -33 pounds on average over the course of 16 years! (Women who slept a measly 5 hours had a 32 percent chance of gaining 30 or more pounds). Other studies have linked lack of sleep to a higher BMI and have found that it negatively affects levels of the appetite-regulating hormones ghrelin and leptin.

Detour:  Don’t sacrifice your snooze time- not even for an extra long run. And quality matters more than quantity, so taking a siesta later won’t help. In a 20-minute power nap you don’t get the deep-sleep stages. You need to go throught the cycles of sleep over a few hours to get the restorative rest that allows your body to work properly. Bottom line: You’re better off sleeping through your workout every other day than stumbling to a sunrise Pilates class on too few Z’s.


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