MySleepApnea.Org

Archive for the ‘Clips of Sleep Apnea’ Category

brain-damage

Studies show that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) affects much more than just your sleep. It can even damage your brain.

A recent brain imaging study from France involved 16 adults. Each of them had just been diagnosed with sleep apnea.

In numerous brain regions the study found a loss of “gray matter.” This is brain tissue that contains fibers and nerve cell  bodies. There also was a decrease in brain metabolism.

The authors suggest that these changes may explain some of the impairments that often occur in people with sleep apnea. Examples include attention lapses and memory loss. The study was published in March 2009 issue of the Journal of Sleep Research.

The results are similar to those found by a research team from UCLA. Their study was published in Neuroscience Letters in June 2008. They reported that people with sleep apnea have tissue loss in the “mammillary bodies.” These are brain regions that help store memory.

In July 2008 the UCLA team published another brain imaging study in the journal Sleep.It involved 41 people with moderate to severe sleep apnea. It also included 69 control subjects matched by age.

Results show that people with sleep apnea have extensive alterations in “white matter.” This is nerve tissue in the brain. It contains fibers that are insulated with myelin -a white, fatty sheath. The structural changes appear in brain regions that help control mood and memory. These regions also play a role in adjusting your blood pressure. Damage also was found in fiber pathways that connect these brain regions.

What causes the brain damage? The authors suggest that oxygen, blood flow and blood pressure may be involved. Sleep apnea involves breathing pauses that can occur hundreds of times a night of sleep. These pauses can produce drastic changes in oxygen levels.

These breathing pauses also reduce blood flow in the brain. People with sleep apnea also are at risk for high blood pressure. Both of these conditions create a potential for brain tissue damage.

Dr. Ronald Harper of UCLA said that the studies show how important it is for sleep apnea to be treated. CPAP is the most common treatment for sleep apnea. The findings make it all the more imperative that OSA be treated as soon as possible to prevent further injury. The long-term effects of OSA are terribly damaging to memory and thinking processes.

Can treatment reverse the brain damage caused by sleep apnea? The authors are uncertain if the changes are permanent.

But studies show that CPAP does help your heart, it may even save your life.

mind-racing

Insomnia can make you feel like your mind is racing out of control. A revealing new study explains why your brain may be unable to put the brakes on your thoughts. It links the problem to low levels of a brain chemical.

A new study shows that GABA levels are reduced by 30 percent in adults with chronic primary insomnia. The study was published in the Nov. 1 issue of the journal Sleep.

GABA is reduced in the brain of individuals with insomnia, suggesting over activity is present. It was explained that low GABA levels create an imbalance of brain activity. This may lead to an inability to shut down waking signals in the brain.

If your GABA levels are low, then your mind can’t slow down. It may race forward at full speed even when it is time to sleep. An over active mind is a key feature of psychophsicological insomnia. At bedtime you are unable to stop thinking and worrying. Your body may be ready for sleep, but your mind remains alert. This state of “hyperarousal” can make it hard for you to fall asleep.

Most with insomnia have “secondary” insomnia. It occurs along with another medical problem, mental illness or sleep disorder. It also may result from the use of a medication or substance. In contrast primary insomnia is unrelated to another health problem. Estimates that about 25 percent of people with insomnia have primary insomnia. The study only links low GABA levels to long lasting, primary insomnia.

All participants in the study had been suffering from primary insomnia for mor than six months. The average duration of their symptoms was about 10 years. The GABA connection affirms that primary insomnia is a legitimate disorder.

Recognition that insomnia has manifestations in the brain may increase the legitimacy of those who have insomnia and report substantial daytime  consequences. It was also explained that insomnia can affect your energy, concentration and mood. It also increases your risk of depression.

One solution for the problem of primary insomnia is the use of hypnotic medication. The short-term use of a sleeping pill can help break the cycle of sleepless nights. The study notes that many of the most effective sleeping pills increase activity at the GABA neurons.

Another treatment option is cognitive behavioral therapy. CBT helps you learn how to correct attitudes and habits that hinder your sleep. Many of these bad habits develop as people try to cope with chronic insomnia.

420G CPAP Sale
Call us Today!      888-700-5155

420G Text Information

HomeSleepQuiz

Just a few reasons to take a Home Sleep Test:

Know the Facts!

A home sleep test or (HST) measures the airflow from your nose and mouth, often because of a suspected case of Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Partical breath intakes are called hypoapneas & the total cessation of breath is apnea. Either way you still are not providing enough oxygen to your body, and most importantly to your brain. Both can last up to 10 seconds, add that up in an 8 hour sleep period, 10 seconds out of a minute pretty much equals out to only really getting 4-5.5 hours of sleep; possibly not even allowing your brain to go into deep, restorative sleep, causing your to be a bed head! Fatigued, and irritated to start the day!  The home sleep test will calculate the number of both hypo & apneas that you experience through out the night.

  There are two types of consequences of letting sleep apnea take control: 1. Disruptive & 2. Life threatening. Some of the attributes for disruptive issues are, daytime fatigue, depression, irritability, sexual dysfunction, learning and memory difficulties. These can come into effect within days of sleep deprivation. Stress will enforce them more strongly, and surely may make things feel in a fog, forget-fullness, disorientation, and thoughts of inner challenges can soon come to surface. Take the breath that you need, and relax, speak with someone here at our facility and the answers you need, sleep better tonight.

  Life-threatening consequences include congestive heart rhythms, stroke, irregular heart rhythms, and fatal car accidents. Such challenges that arise can hurt you physically and cause harm to others, epesically on the roadways. It takes only seconds for a slip up, this is called micro-sleep. Fours seconds was documented to the quickest time for someone to lose control of their vehicle during the onset of micro-sleep. (example here).

Talking to one of our Certified Respiratory Technicians, we can come up with a plan to getting you back to a more restful, peaceful, enjoyable, & (quieter for your partner) kind of sleep. You both deserve a good night!

Dr. Michael Breus

Michael J. Breus, Ph.D., is a Clinical Psychologist and a Diplomate of the American Board of Sleep Medicine. He was one of the youngest people to have passed the Board at age 31 and, with a specialty in Sleep Disorders and Neuropsychological Testing, he is one of only 159 doctors in the world with his credentials and distinction. He is the co-founder of SoundSleep Solutions, a direct-to-consumer, sleep-related information Web site, and currently serves as Chairman of the Clinical Advisory Board for Sleep Holdings, Inc. (SLHJ.PK), the only publicly traded sleep diagnostic and therapy company in the world.


MSA-logo